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    EV Fires: High-level panel to submit report on testing standards in 2-3 weeks

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    EV Fires: High-level panel to submit report on testing standards in 2-3 weeks

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    EV fires: According to the sources, the fresh standards are likely to focus on traceability of foreign suppliers of cells and battery components.

    The high-level committee reviewing testing standards for electric vehicles (EVs) following the recent fire incidents is likely to submit its report in two-three weeks, sources told CNBC-TV18 on Tuesday.
    The committee will recommend steps for strengthening standards related to battery testing and quality controls, they said.
    According to the sources, the fresh standards are likely to focus on traceability of foreign suppliers of cells and battery components. For this, the government is considering asking EV makers to submit due diligence reports of their foreign suppliers.
    The new standards come as concerns have risen lately over the safety of electric vehicles after the recent fire incidents and as reports suggest defective cells and batteries may have caused them.
    At least ten incidents of fire on EVs were reported in the last two-three months in different parts of the country.
    In May, CNBC-TV18 had reported that several EV companies were likely using lower quality cells despite submitting A-grade cells for testing, taking advantage of the loosely-framed rules in the absence of surprise checks. The report had also highlighted issues with the battery management system used by many EV makers.
    The Centre is also looking at possibility of making third-party inspection mandatory for surprise audits and checks to ensure cells and battery components submitted for testing are same as those in actual usage, said the sources, on the condition of anonymity.
    The new standards may be applied to all EVs, irrespective of the speed.
    The probe has revealed lack of proper sorting of cells in EVs which caught fire, as per the sources, who also added that there has been laxity on the part of companies towards ensuring that cells of same voltage are used in a battery pack.
    "Quality deficiencies have been found in welding of metal plate which holds the cells together," they said.
    The probe also revealed lack of adequate BMS system which can prevent short circuit or isolate defective cells in many cases.
    Companies like Ola, Boom, Pure EV, Jitendra EV and Okinawa have been asked to explain the recent incidents of fires on their vehicles.
    They are likely to respond with explanations and compliance reports soon.
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